Till Death Do Us Part

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Poster for the movie
© 1998 Golden Harvest Company − All right reserved.
Poster for the movie "Till Death Do Us Part"

Till Death Do Us Part (1998)

Drama, Action - 3 December 1998
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Although directed by Daniel Lee, ...Till Death Do Us Partbears many of the hallmarks of its executive producer, Derek Yee.

Director:  Daniel Lee

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Storyline

Although directed by Daniel Lee, ...Till Death Do Us Partbears many of the hallmarks of its executive producer, Derek Yee.


Collections: Daniel Lee

Genres: Drama, Action

Details

Official Website: 
Country:   Hong Kong
Language:  Cantonese
Release Date:  3 December 1998

Box Office

Company Credits

Production Companies:  Golden Harvest Company

Technical Specs

Although directed by Daniel Lee, …Till Death Do Us Partbears many of the hallmarks of its executive producer, Derek Yee.

Yee helmed 1993’s sophisticated weepie C’est La Vie, Mon Cheri (UdineIncontri 1998), and this work similarly features an above-par script, some solid plotting, and a desire to treat its characters and their world with respect. However, what begins as a realistic portrayal of marital despair changes tack midway to become an exciting, if somewhat unbalanced, psycho-drama. Anita Yuen plays Bo-bo, a middle-class housewife and parttime illustrator who’s happily married to her cop husband, Alex (Alex Fong). Happily married, that is, until the evening he cancels her credit cards and moves in with his sultry new girlfriend, Belle, played by current super-babe Almen Wong. Yuen – everybody’s favourite beauty-queen-next-door – excels in a meatier role than usual, although she’s ultimately undermined by the script’s increasing demands for histrionics. But Almen Wong’s restrained perfor- mance as the girlfriend nicely conterpoints Yuen’s rage, and her patience wins some audience sympathy in spite of her home-breaker role. Also cast against type is Francis Ng, almost unrecognisable at first as a goodguy lawyer who befriends Yuen. Director Lee bravely attempts to transcend the limits of a kitchen-sinker by means of some daring theatrics, and the result is one of the better dramas of 1998.

Richard James Havis

Thanks to Far East Film Festival