Ann Hui

Born in China in 1947, she moved to Hong Kong in her youth. After graduating in English and Comparative Literature from Hong Kong University, she spent two years at the London Film School.

Returned to Hong Kong, she worked as an assistant to director King Hu before joining TVB to direct drama series and short documentaries. In the late ‘70s she started the Hong Kong New Wave movement with other prominent filmmakers. Among the many New Wave directors, her style is known as varied and flexible, searching constantly the experiment with new genres. She directed 23 feature films of all genres and won various prizes worldwide. She is currently the head of Hong Kong Directors’ Association.

Ann Hui On-Wah, MBE (traditional Chinese: 許鞍華; simplified Chinese: 许鞍华; pinyin: Xǔ Ānhuá; Hepburn: Kyo Anka; born 23 May 1947) is a Hong Kong actress, director, producer and occasional screenwriter.

Ann Hui studied at the University of Hong Kong and at the London Film School in the early 1970s. Upon her return to Hong Kong, she worked as the assistant director to martial arts film master King Hu.

Her debut feature film The Secret (1979) starring Sylvia Chang, made Hui one of the key figures in the Hong Kong New Wave film movement that she contributed shaping together with Tsui Hark, John Woo, and Patrick Tam among others. Since then, she has directed 26 features, two hour-long documentaries, several shorts and has been the Associate Producer for other major directors such as Yim Ho and Xie Jin.

Her films have been screened at major international film festivals since the early stages of her career including Boat People (1982) and Song of the Exile (1990) in Cannes, Summer Snow (1995) and Ordinary Heroes (1999) in Berlin and A Simple Life and The Golden Era (2014) in Venice.

She has won more best director awards at the Hong Kong Film Awards than anyone else with six awards and she is the only director having won the Grand Slam for Hong Kong Film Awards (meaning that a film won best picture, best director, best screenplay and best actor and actress at the same time).

Her ability in directing actors and carving memorable female characters interpreted by major film stars including Maggie Cheung (Song of the Exile), Deanie Ip (A Simple Life) and Tang Wei (The Golden Era) among others is testified by the several prizes for best actresses that her films have received. Her career has confirmed her as one of the best female directors in Asia.

Love After Love

The film tells the story of a young girl who travels from Shanghai to Hong Kong in pursuit of education, but ends up working for her aunt seducing rich and powerful men.

Summer Snow

The Suns are a typical Hong Kong family: May, forty something, works for a trading company; her husband, Bing, works as a low-grade civil servant, and Allen, their teenage son, is still at school. Trouble strikes one day when Bing’s mother dies of a stroke, leaving her husband old Mr. Sun. Alzheimer’s Disease is diagnosed. From that day on, the family’s daily life is thrown into a poignant. Old Mr. Sun develops a tendency to … Read more

Princess Fragrance

Princess Fragrance is a 1987 Hong Kong film based on Louis Cha’s novel The Book and the Sword. The film is a sequel to The Romance of Book and Sword, which was released earlier in the same month and was also directed by Ann Hui.

Love in a Fallen City

Taking place in 1941, Love in a Fallen City centers on Pai (Cora Miao), a young woman who has been ostracized by her family for divorcing her rich husband. A local match-maker, Mrs. Hsu (Helen Ma), takes pity on Pai and decides to bring her to Hong Kong, under the guise of employing her as the Hsu’s nanny, but in reality to introduce her to Fan (Chow Yun-Fat). Pai and Fan seem to hit it … Read more

The Romance of Book and Sword

The story is based on the popular novel developed from folk legend. It goes that the Manchurian emperor Qianlong of China (circa 18th Century) was actually the son of a Han Chinese, the subject ethnicity. His brother of blood, Chen Jialuo just happened to be the chief of the Red Flower Society, an anti-Manchu secret society. Chen, a learned scholar, thought he could get his brother turn his back on the Manchu and restore the … Read more

Zodiac Killers

Hong Kong student Ben Lee becomes friends with his mainland Chinese classmate Chang Chih while studying abroad in Japan. Ben is unmotivated to study and only cares about money and on the other hand, whenever Chih encounters a Chinese person, he would ask whereabouts of his childhood sweetheart. Ming is also from Hong Kong and in order to elevate his social status, he becomes involved with a bar hostess and owner Yuriko, hoping to become … Read more

Boat People

A Japanese photojournalist revisits Vietnam after the Liberation and learns harsh truths about its regime and its “New Economic Zones”.

The Way We Are

The Way We Are is a respectful, unglamorous, and serenely charming portrait of regular people and a Hong Kong town that normally gets a bad rap. It may put you to sleep, but the visit and Ann Hui’s quiet touch are exceptionally worthwhile.

Our Time Will Come

In the 1940s, school teacher Fang Lan becomes embroiled with the resistance efforts of local guerilla group Dongjiang during the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong. Fang is recruited by one of the resistance group’s captain Blackie Lau after assisting the group with a rescue mission of novelist Mao Dun. Fang’s mother volunteers to take her place as a courier for a mission and is arrested. To save her mother, Fang finds herself turning to a … Read more

A Simple Life

The relationship between a middle-aged man (Andy Lau) and the elderly woman (Deanie Ip), who has been the family’s helper for sixty years.

Visible Secret

Urban tale of fantasies, genre greatly favoured by Hong-Kong cinematography, the latest movie of filmmaker Ann Hui combines elements of horror films with other comical aspects to offer an intriguing and terrifying work of great visual strength.

The Golden Era

Hong Kong master Ann Hui recreates the life of the pioneering and prodigiously talented 20th-century female novelist Xiao Hong.

Goddess of Mercy

Yang Rui falls in love for the cleaning woman who works in a taekwando gym, only to later discover she’s an undercover cop named An Xin. An is in hiding from drug smugglers who have a score to settle with her – a raid she led resulted in the death of one of the smuggler’s parents. To complicate matters further, An was previously romantically involved with the smuggler whose parents were killed.

Ordinary Heroes

Ordinary Heroes is a narration about the life stories of an advocate, a prostitute, a social worker, and a priest during the social movements from 1970s to 1980s in Hong Kong. The film is based upon true stories.

Beautiful 2012

A superb package of shorts by four leading East Asian directors: Ann Hui on a male-to-female sex change, Kim Tae-yong on an emotional imposture, Gu Changwei on pregnancy in China and Tsai Ming-Liang on time and the city of Hong Kong.

The Postmodern Life of My Aunt

Ye Rutang (Siqin Gaowa), a single-living woman in her late fifties, struggles to maintain a dignified life amid the dangers of Shanghai.