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Funeral March

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Funeral March (2001)

97 min - - 25 September 2001
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Charlene Choi plays Yee, a beautiful young girl from an affluent family, however she finds out that she has suffered from cancer, so she begins to prepare for her own funeral with the help of a young funeral director Duan(Eason Chan) They gradually falls in love with each other during their field trip to U.S.A, Yee then realizes how much she values her life. But later, she finally learns about one of Duan's secret, which end up a sad ending of the story.

Director:  Joe Ma Wai-Ho
Writers:  Joe Ma Wai-Ho, Sunny Chan, Chan Gam-Kuen

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Charlene Choi plays Yee, a beautiful young girl from an affluent family, however she finds out that she has suffered from cancer, so she begins to prepare for her own funeral with the help of a young funeral director Duan(Eason Chan) They gradually falls in love with each other during their field trip to U.S.A, Yee then realizes how much she values her life. But later, she finally learns about one of Duan's secret, which end up a sad ending of the story.


Collections: Joe Ma Wai-Ho

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Language:  Cantonese
Release Date:  25 September 2001

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Runtime:  1 h 37 min

When director Joe Ma set about making the most morbid Hong Kong film of 2001, the resulting FUNERAL MARCH reaffirmed local filmmakers’ ability to make moving and personal dramas that leave glossy Hollywood weepies standing.

Best known for a successful line of comedies, Ma pushed the colour and cheer of earlier work aside, casting muted tones across the screen as his stars slowly reduced Hong Kong cinemagoers to tears with subtle, emotional performances. Rising talent Eason Chan plays an undertaker named Duan, approached by rich cancer patient Yee to organise her funeral. The girl has intestinal cancer and troubles at home have her dead-set on refusing treatment. Advance payment is arranged and soon Duan’s signed up to help. Companionship builds in both Hong Kong and New York City, where the girl visits for more pre-death arrangements, and a supportive relationship builds in the face of an inevitable parting of ways. Lead actors Chan and Choi excel in roles far removed from those of their up-and-coming pop singer personalities, playing characters viewers can understand and relate to, each showing a depth of emotion on screen unexpected from relatively new Hong Kong talent. FUNERAL MARCH’s consistent scripting and refined production work never cross the line into overly manipulative or cliched territory, and by the time the film closes with a new day beginning over Hong Kong Harbour, FUNERAL MARCH succeeds at quietly trumpeting sincere messages of hope, support and living for the future.

Tim Youngs

Thanks to Far East Film Festival