China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province

0
Poster for the movie
© 2009 − All right reserved.
Poster for the movie "China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province"

China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province (2009)

38 min - Documentary - 7 May 2009
Your rating:
Not rated yet!

On May 12, 2008, a catastrophic earthquake hit Sichuan Province in rural China, killing nearly 70,000 people, including 10,000 children. In town after town, poorly constructed school buildings crumbled, wiping out classrooms filled with students, most of them their parents' only child. But when grieving mothers and fathers sought explanations and justice, they found their path blocked by incompetence, corruption and empty promises.

Stars: 

Photos

No images were imported for this movie.

Storyline

On May 12, 2008, a catastrophic earthquake hit Sichuan Province in rural China, killing nearly 70,000 people, including 10,000 children. In town after town, poorly constructed school buildings crumbled, wiping out classrooms filled with students, most of them their parents' only child. But when grieving mothers and fathers sought explanations and justice, they found their path blocked by incompetence, corruption and empty promises.


Collections: Jon Alpert, Matthew O'Neill

Genres: Documentary

Details

Official Website: 
Release Date:  7 May 2009

Box Office

Company Credits

Production Companies: 

Technical Specs

Runtime:  0 h 38 min

On May 12, 2008, a catastrophic earthquake hit Sichuan Province in rural China, killing nearly 70,000 people, including 10,000 children.

China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province Movie Trailer

China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province is a 2009 documentary film co-directed by Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill of the Downtown Community Television Center, and produced by MZ Pictures for HBO Films.

The documentary covers the aftermath of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake on May 12, which killed around 70,000 people—of which 10,000 were children, many of whom were killed when their schools collapsed.

The film focuses on the grieving families and communities of the children, as they mourn their loss and question the government over the construction standard of the schools.

Alpert and O’Neill sent the raw footage of the film by courier to the United States, before they were detained and questioned by local police for eight hours as they tried to leave the country themselves.

In September 2009, the filmmakers were scheduled to present the film at the Shanghai International Film Festival, but were denied visas by the Chinese government. [wikipedia]

 

 

If you like this article, please help us by making a donation so that we can continue our work. Please help keep us independent.