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Ballistic Kiss

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Poster for the movie "Ballistic Kiss"

Ballistic Kiss (1998)

92 min - Foreign, Action, Thriller - 21 March 1998
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Cat is a killer-for-hire intends on finding his nemesis wesley for revenge. When cat finally meets his long-awaited opponent a chain of events led to cat holding a policewoman hostage. They gradually begina a precarious relationship that may or may not affect cats ultimate mission to take wesleys life.

Director:  Donnie Yen
Writers:  Bey Logan, Donnie Yen

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Storyline

Cat is a killer-for-hire intends on finding his nemesis wesley for revenge. When cat finally meets his long-awaited opponent a chain of events led to cat holding a policewoman hostage. They gradually begina a precarious relationship that may or may not affect cats ultimate mission to take wesleys life.


Collections: Donnie Yen

Tagline: Revenge drenched in reds, blues, and splattered blood.

Details

Official Website: 
Country:   Hong Kong
Language:  Cantonese, English
Release Date:  21 March 1998

Box Office

Company Credits

Production Companies:  Bullet Films

Technical Specs

Runtime:  1 h 32 min

Five oddball characters endure the rigours of army training and Action star Donnie Yen’s second film as director – following the very impressive Legend of the Wolf – is a darkly romantic “killer’s nocturne” shot through with references to Léon and The Collector.

From a script by English martial-artist-turned-writer Bey Logan, it’s a bold attempt, despite budgetary constraints, to come up with an intense, chamber-like love story within a commercial genre. First seen wasting a heavily-guarded mobster, Cat (Yen) is a coolly-composed, professional assassin who’s thinking of quitting his job. He’s persuaded to do one last hit that will give him the opportunity to get even with a former cop (Jimmy Wong) who betrayed him when they both were in New York’s police department. Unfortunately, policewoman Carrie (Annie Wu) is after Cat, who ends up kidnapping her, falling for her and putting his life on the line. Richly scored by Japanese composer Yukie Nishimura, and shot by cameraman Wong Ka-fai in gritty, dark tones, the movie is an intense ride that demonstrates Yen’s whiplash athleticism and more firepower than World War II in the movie’s two showpieces – a shootout in a cinema and an immense gun battle in Cat’s apartment. Taiwanese starlet Wu (from Jackie Chan’s Police Story 4 – First Strike) can also be seen in another of this year’s Midnight Mayhem movies, The Demon’s Baby.

Derek Elley