2000 AD

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© 2000 Media Asia Film − All right reserved.
Poster for the movie "2000 AD"

2000 AD (2000)

109 min - Action, Thriller - 1 January 2000
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The Y2K Bug. Real Warfare vs Electronic Gaming. Peter Tong, a carefree Hong Kong youngster, finds himself drawn into the web of a deadly espionage conspiracy. A clandestine organization schemes to use the Y2K Bug to cause mayhem throughout Asia. To survive, Peter has to call on reserves of courage and stamina he has never needed before.

Director:  Gordon Chan
Writers:  Gordon Chan, Stu Zicherman

Photos

Storyline

The Y2K Bug. Real Warfare vs Electronic Gaming. Peter Tong, a carefree Hong Kong youngster, finds himself drawn into the web of a deadly espionage conspiracy. A clandestine organization schemes to use the Y2K Bug to cause mayhem throughout Asia. To survive, Peter has to call on reserves of courage and stamina he has never needed before.


Collections: Gordon Chan

Genres: Action, Thriller

Details

Official Website: 
Country:   Hong Kong Singapore
Language:  English, 普通话
Release Date:  1 January 2000

Box Office

Company Credits

Production Companies:  Media Asia Film, Raintree Pictures

Technical Specs

Runtime:  1 h 49 min

Chan is one of the brightest lights on the local scene, a director-screenwriter with the rare ability to elevate mainstream genres so that their “commercialness” does not mean a corresponding lack in intelligence and artistry.

2000 AD is attractive and slick, but there isn’t much substance below the glittery surface. It’s one of those plots rife with conspiracies and high-tech mumbo jumbo, concerning computer viruses and the CIA and massive destruction. Greg (Ray Lui) is a tycoon in the computer business whose business connections are complicated, to say the least. His younger brother, Peter (Aaron Kwok), is a computer whiz, carefree and puerile till Greg is killed in a terrorist attack. Peter, his fiancée Janet (newcomer Gigi Choi), and her brother-and Peter’s business partner-Benny (Daniel Wu), decide to track down the killers. It is a trail that eventually leads to Singapore. There is a lot of Singaporean talent on view here, and such Lion City television personalities as James Lye and Phyllis Quek, though unknown in Hong Kong, display considerable screen presence and have no problems delivering the film’s trilingual (Mandarin, Cantonese, English) dialogue. One of Gordon Chan’s strong points is delineating characters with more depth than the usual mainstream movie. The chases, fights, and shoot-outs in Singapore are probably the best ever shot in the island nation.

Paul Fonoroff

Thanks to Far East Film Festival