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Eight cities now on lockdown in China, First virus death outside Hubei province

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An 80-year-old man died in Hebei Province after visiting relatives for about a couple of months in Wuhan.

76 people who have been in close contact with the man are in quarantine, but at the moment there are no signs of fever.

The deaths confirmed at the moment are 18, of which 17 in the province of Hubei alone, the epicenter of the outbreak, while the people infected are at least 647, but they could be many more.

Local authorities reacted to the state of crisis by imposing a travel ban first on Wuhan alone and then extended to seven other cities in the region: Huanggang, Ezhou, Chibi, Xiantao, Qianjiang, Zhijiang, and Lichuan.

Flights, trains, buses, and ferries connecting Wuhan to other cities in Hubei have been suspended. From Friday, car-sharing services will also be suspended.

Coronavirus cases have so far been diagnosed in 23 provinces, four municipalities, Hong Kong, Macau, and six other countries.

Chinese health authorities on Thursday confirmed cases of pneumonia caused by coronavirus in individuals that had no recent travel experience to central China’s Wuhan.

The National Health Commission also reported increasing cases with no exposure to Wuhan’s Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, which is believed to be related to most of the infected cases, adding that cases without confirmed exposure to the market have been found overseas.

The Hubei authorities also suspended all operations of local travel agencies and ordered all schools to postpone the start of the spring semester. The Chinese finance ministry has announced the allocation of 1 billion yuan ($ 144 million) to combat the spread of the disease.

UnionPay International and PayPal Enter Global Partnership Agreement to Accelerate Growth of Digital Payments

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UnionPay International (UPI) and PayPal (NASDAQ: PYPL), today announced a global partnership where both companies will work together to accelerate the growth of their networks. 

As part of the agreement, PayPal has committed to supporting UPI acceptance globally where PayPal is accepted – giving UnionPay cardholders more choice when shopping. In the future, UPI will explore opportunities to support PayPal’s merchant and consumer ambitions in China.

“At PayPal, we are proud of this landmark agreement with UnionPay International and the global impact that this creates for our joint customers, building on our status as the first foreign payments platform licensed to process online payments in China,” said Jim Magats, senior vice president of global payments, PayPal. “The partnership will give UnionPay customers more choice when shopping cross border and has the ability to contribute to the overall growth of China’s e-commerce ecosystem. It will also give PayPal the opportunity to explore the option to expand PayPal’s digital wallet to physical retail locations where UnionPay is accepted in China, or internationally.”

UnionPay cards can now be added to PayPal wallets in Australia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand. During 2020, PayPal and UPI plan to add more than 30 markets, which means that once a UnionPay card is added to the PayPal wallet these cardholders will have the ability to shop at any of the 24 million merchants globally where PayPal is accepted via the PayPal wallet.

As part of the agreement, PayPal and UPI have also committed to collaborating to better serve joint customers and merchants to grow digital payments in China and globally. This will include the opportunity for PayPal customers from around the world to use PayPal at the merchants where UnionPay is accepted.

“With about 130 million UnionPay cards issued outside mainland China, UnionPay cards are becoming an important payment option of more and more global customers,” said Larry Wang, vice president, UnionPay International. “We are very glad to deepen collaboration with PayPal, the global leader in e-commerce. Both parties will jointly explore and implement the application of new products and new payment modes in the field of cross-border payment, hoping to better serve our cardholders and create greater value for both sides.”

The global partnership also includes a commitment from both companies to create joint customer awareness campaigns to “Pay with UnionPay” at PayPal merchants worldwide.

Travel Ban issued for residents of Wuhan amid a coronavirus outbreak

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From 10 am on Tuesday, all city buses, subways, ferries, and long-distance transport are suspended in Wuhan.

Wuhan authorities have announced a travel ban on city residents due to the coronavirus epidemic that killed 17 people and infecting another 550 in China.

The news was released by CCTV on Wednesday.

Trains and flights departing from Wuhan will also be temporarily suspended. The notice did not say when the services would resume.

According to the authorities, the ban in Wuhan, which has a population of 11 million and is China’s fourth railway hub, is to “best prevent and control the epidemic of the new type of coronavirus infection, effectively cut off the transmission of the virus, and curb the spread of the epidemic to ensure the safety and health of the people”.

The Wuhan government also issued another notice mandating that everyone wear masks in public places, including civil servants and employees of public institutions.

Some residents rushed to the Wuhan flight station and airport trying to leave the city soon after the government announcement.

The outbreak of the epidemic came at the worst time of the year, during the Chinese New Year celebrations when millions of Chinese workers return to their hometowns to spend the holidays with their families.

Other provinces, such as Jiangsu, have issued bans to prevent travel to Wuhan, and have set up checkpoints to inspect passengers from Wuhan.

Wednesday, Beijing News reported that Wuhan is struggling to cope with the situation, with overcrowded hospitals and numerous feverish patients waiting.

Most infections and deaths occurred in Wuhan, where the virus is supposed to have originated. Numerous infected people live or work near the Huanan Fish Market, which has been identified as the source of the outbreak.

The World Health Organization remains in close contact with local authorities.

Source: scpm

Top 7 Classical Chinese Literature Books Recommended for Reading

China has its fair share of ancient Chinese literature. Below, we have compiled a list of some of the most noteworthy works, otherwise known as the best Chinese literature books ever.

They explore various themes, from love to history to family, and successfully capture the true essence of what it means to be alive and human.

  1. The Dream of the Red Chamber by Cao Xueqin

The Dream of the Red Chamber is unarguably one of China’s greatest gems in its realm of literature. The book was published in the 18th century and followed the rise and decline of a Chinese noble family, believed to be Cao Xueqin’s own. It is noted to be a memorial to the young women who graced his younger years, whether they were friends, relatives, or even servants in his home.

The novel is a memoir and serves to remind its readers of the simple yet chaotic understanding of the human mind and how families work. By extension, this piece of literature mirrors the saga of the royal Qing dynasty, too. It is said to be one of the best forms of ancient Chinese literature ever written.

2. The Romance of the Three Kingdoms

This novel by Luo Guan Zhong is one of the staples in Chinese literature and was written to follow the stories of the rules who graced the stage during the “Three Kingdoms Period” in ancient Chinese history.

In this semi-historical masterpiece, the battles are recounted in intriguingly detailed language. Special attention is paid to the shifting alliances. However, how much of this work is true and how much fiction cannot be verified. Nevertheless, The Romance of Three Kingdoms still stands today as one of the greatest literary works in all of Chinese history.

3. Water Margin by Shi Nai An

Water Margin tails the lives and ideologies of a band of intellectuals who waged war against the Song Dynasty, which is known to be one of the most corrupt dynasties in Chinese history. While the general claim is that the author of this novel is Shi Nai An, scholars still argue over the real ownership of the text. Some also believe that the story is not pure fiction, and perhaps is an account of a group of forty Chinese rebels who fought against Song legionaries.

4. Journey to the West by Wu Cheng’en

Journey to the West is a 16th century Chinese novel about a group of travelers and a monkey who set out to visit the great, unknown west as they travel through the Silk Road, India, Mongolian lands, and Muslim empires. Journey to the West is one of the most important novels in China because it highlights the nation’s rich historical past, which involved travel, trade, and the evergreen Silk Route. It is, to date, one of the best Chinese literature forms ever.

1. The Dream of the Red Chamber by Cao Xueqin The Dream of the Red Chamber is unarguably one of China's greatest gems in its realm of literature. The book was published in the 18th century and followed the rise and decline of a Chinese noble family, believed to be Cao Xueqin's own. It is noted to be a memorial to the young women who graced his younger years, whether they were friends, relatives, or even servants in his home. 1. The novel is a memoir and serves to remind its readers of the simple yet chaotic understanding of the human mind and how families work. By extension, this piece of literature mirrors the saga of the royal Qing dynasty, too. It is said to be one of the best forms of ancient Chinese literature ever written. 2. The Romance of the Three Kingdoms This novel by Luo Guan Zhong is one of the staples in Chinese literature and was written to follow the stories of the rules who graced the stage during the “Three Kingdoms Period” in ancient Chinese history. In this semi-historical masterpiece, the battles are recounted in intriguingly detailed language. Special attention is paid to the shifting alliances. However, how much of this work is true and how much fiction cannot be verified. Nevertheless, The Romance of Three Kingdoms still stands today as one of the greatest literary works in all of Chinese history. 3. Water Margin by Shi Nai An Water Margin tails the lives and ideologies of a band of intellectuals who waged war against the Song Dynasty, which is known to be one of the most corrupt dynasties in Chinese history. While the general claim is that the author of this novel is Shi Nai An, scholars still argue over the real ownership of the text. Some also believe that the story is not pure fiction, and perhaps is an account of a group of forty Chinese rebels who fought against Song legionaries. 4. Journey to the West by Wu Cheng’en Journey to the West is a 16th century Chinese novel about a group of travelers and a monkey who set out to visit the great, unknown west as they travel through the Silk Road, India, Mongolian lands, and Muslim empires. Journey to the West is one of the most important novels in China because it highlights the nation’s rich historical past, which involved travel, trade, and the evergreen Silk Route. It is, to date, one of the best Chinese literature forms ever. 5. Fengshen Yanyi by Xu Zhonglin Loosely translated as “Tales of the Teahouse Retold: Investiture of the Gods,” Fengshen Yanyi is a 16th-century fantasy novel about how a group of Chinese gods waged civil war amongst themselves after splitting into two opposing parties. One party supported King Zhou, whereas the other was in favor of his opponent, King Wu. The book is known across China as one of the best fantasy novels ever written. 6. Flower in the Mirror by Li Ruzhen Flower in the Mirror spans across 100 chapters. It goes into great detail about the age-old myths of Tang Ao, Duo Jiugong, and their companions, as well as that of Tang Xiaoshan and another set of 100 female artists who were magically blessed with talents that helped them pass an imperial election. The story is dotted with interesting characters, like flower fairies and strong female leads. Unlike most notable Chinese works, this one does not recount true historical tales, making it one of the few traditional Chinese books to do so. Hence, it is seen as a valid example of the best Chinese literature out there. Because this novel spans over 100 chapters, critics still argue over when exactly it was written. Modern readers wonder how a single person managed to write it all, asking how he had the time. In present-day scenarios, students don’t have the time to write even a single paper, let alone 100 chapters. To overcome this challenge, many students hire an online freelance art writer to write their paper for them, with certified low percentage plagerism. Some students even sign up to become one themselves as a side hustle. 7. Nie Hai Hua by Zeng Pu Nie Hai Hua was written during the reign of the Qing Dynasty. The title translates into “Flower in the Sea of Evil” and is one of the Late Qing Four Condemned Novels because of the radical ideas it promoted, especially against the evils of the ruling party. It takes on China’s social and political policies headfirst with little regard for what others might think, making it one of the finest pieces of literature not only in China but globally, too. This novel was banned in China for some time. A similar case is seen with students in the modern age who submit plagiarized work. To beat plagiarism, students and teachers alike use online plagiarism checkers. It’s smart to check with a plagiarism checker free online before handing in any assignment to avoid getting into trouble. Using a tool like this can help in checking the exact percentage of plagiarism in a text. All in all, these are the best Chinese literature books ever penned and can be found in any Chinese library. They’re certainly worth the read and offer much-needed insight into the workings of tradition, power, and humanity.

5. Fengshen Yanyi by Xu Zhonglin

Loosely translated as “Tales of the Teahouse Retold: Investiture of the Gods,” Fengshen Yanyi is a 16th-century fantasy novel about how a group of Chinese gods waged civil war amongst themselves after splitting into two opposing parties. One party supported King Zhou, whereas the other was in favor of his opponent, King Wu. The book is known across China as one of the best fantasy novels ever written.

6. Flower in the Mirror by Li Ruzhen

Flower in the Mirror spans across 100 chapters. It goes into great detail about the age-old myths of Tang Ao, Duo Jiugong, and their companions, as well as that of Tang Xiaoshan and another set of 100 female artists who were magically blessed with talents that helped them pass an imperial election. The story is dotted with interesting characters, like flower fairies and strong female leads. Unlike most notable Chinese works, this one does not recount true historical tales, making it one of the few traditional Chinese books to do so. Hence, it is seen as a valid example of the best Chinese literature out there.

Because this novel spans over 100 chapters, critics still argue over when exactly it was written. Modern readers wonder how a single person managed to write it all, asking how he had the time. In present-day scenarios, students don’t have the time to write even a single paper, let alone 100 chapters. To overcome this challenge, many students hire an online freelance art writer to write their paper for them, with certified low percentage plagerism. Some students even sign up to become one themselves as a side hustle.

7. Nie Hai Hua by Zeng Pu

Nie Hai Hua was written during the reign of the Qing Dynasty. The title translates into “Flower in the Sea of Evil” and is one of the Late Qing Four Condemned Novels because of the radical ideas it promoted, especially against the evils of the ruling party. It takes on China’s social and political policies headfirst with little regard for what others might think, making it one of the finest pieces of literature not only in China but globally, too.

This novel was banned in China for some time. A similar case is seen with students in the modern age who submit plagiarized work. To beat plagiarism, students and teachers alike use online plagiarism checkers. It’s smart to check with a plagiarism checker free online before handing in any assignment to avoid getting into trouble. Using a tool like this can help in checking the exact percentage of plagiarism in a text.

All in all, these are the best Chinese literature books ever penned and can be found in any Chinese library. They’re certainly worth the read and offer much-needed insight into the workings of tradition, power, and humanity.

Animal Quarantine Service of Japan taking action over the possible introduction of ASF in the lead-up to the Chinese Lunar New Year

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Animal Quarantine Service of Japan (AQS), whose Headquarters are located in Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, will be strengthening preventive measures against the introduction of ASF (African Swine Fever), which is spreading across Asia, through meat and meat products in passenger’s luggage.

AQS will make every effort to prevent it through all available resources and means including public awareness on websites, posters and video streaming sites as well as strict border inspection by quarantine detector dogs in the lead up to the Chinese Lunar New Year season (Jan. 24 – 31) when many foreign tourists will visit Japan.

Animal Quarantine Service of Japan taking action over the possible introduction of ASF in the lead-up to the Chinese Lunar New Year

AQS is on high alert to the threat to Japan from ASF which is a rampant contagious disease that has been affecting pigs in Asian countries over the last two years.

Accordingly, from April of last year, there have been strict measures against bringing in illegal meat products. In particular, campaigns are being carried out at each airport, and the security tagged luggage of travelers from ASF affected countries is being given strengthened inspection, especially ahead of the Chinese Lunar New Year when the numbers of travelers increase. Offenders are dealt with through cooperation with related organizations such as the police, aiming for increased prevention against the introduction of ASF.

Animal Quarantine Service of Japan taking action over the possible introduction of ASF in the lead-up to the Chinese Lunar New Year

According to AQS, during 2018 there were 93,897 incidents (109,056kg) of undeclared importation of meat products in travelers’ personal goods (baggage) and 11,650 items (13,170kg) in the post, amounting to over 250 cases in portable goods per day. In addition, in 83 of these recent meat product cases, genes have been found displaying traces of ASF virus, and in two cases infectious viruses have been discovered. In cases of importing meat products illegally, imprisonment of up to three years or a fine of up to one million Japanese Yen can be imposed, and since April of last year seven people have been arrested in four cases.

AQS is expected to increase the number of quarantine detector dogs that are extremely competent in finding meat products to 53 by the end of March and revise the laws to strengthen penalties.

Shanghai 1935 by Ruth Day

American socialite Ruth Day visited Shanghai for several weeks in 1935 and left one of the most sparkling descriptions of the city in this book, published in a limited edition the following year and only brought to the wider world in this new edition published more than 80 years later.

Ruth was the step-daughter of a prominent American financial expert who held a senior post in the Chinese government, and during her whirlwind trip, she met with absolutely everyone who was anyone, and went everywhere the high-society crowd frequented – dancehalls and night-clubs, parties and the best private homes. She describes it all with a rare flair, leaving us with a valuable and unique record of Shanghai high society and the panorama of human experience in the city during its decadent heyday. This is truly a lost classic brought back to life.

About The Author

Ruth Day (1892-1964) was born in Boston as Ruth Van Buren Hugo, and in 1915 married Morgan Glover Day, a member of a prominent family from Springfield Massachusetts. In 1935, she traveled to Shanghai to visit her mother Jane, then married to Dr. Frederick Cleveland (1865-1946) and in China to assist the National Government with its financial administration. Reviews “Every time I read through Shanghai 1935, I get a deeper appreciation of what a gem of a book this is.” — Andrew Field, author of Shanghai’s Dancing World

The Lacquered Talisman By Laurie Dennis

A sweeping coming-of-age epic, The Lacquered Talisman launches the story of one of the most influential figures in Chinese history.

He is the son of a beancurd seller and he will found the Ming Dynasty, which ruled China from 1368 to 1644. Known as “Fortune” as a boy, Zhu Yuanzhang suffers as drought and plague ravage the countryside, and left with nothing but a lacquered necklace from his grandfather, he is deposited in the village temple and is soon wandering the countryside as a begging monk. Signs and dreams convince him that he has a special fate. Is he to be the abbot of a monastery? A general? What matters most is that he prove himself to be a filial son.

About The Author

Laurie Dennis grew up in Illinois and Minnesota and has been studying Chinese since she was a high school freshman in Minneapolis. She has worked as a journalist in the U.S. and in Beijing, China, and she has traveled widely across China, including a research trip to Fengyang, Anhui Province, the birthplace of the founder of the Ming Dynasty. She currently resides in Madison, Wisconsin, where she lives with her husband and works on China programs for her alma mater, the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This is her first novel.

Reviews

“Laurie Dennis knows more than anyone else about the founder of the Ming dynasty, Zhu Yuanzhang. This fictionalized adventure tale fills out the peasant emperor’s own account of his family’s fortunes and misfortunes, and tells us about daily work, games, customs, and religious practices in 14th Century China. Anyone interested in Asian culture or history will enjoy and learn from Dennis’s lively and well-informed story-telling.” — Sarah Schneewind, Professor of History at UC, San Diego, and author of A Tale of Two Melons: Emperor and Subject in Ming China

Dragons and Boxers By Kyle Fiske

Northern China in 1900.

The nation is in turmoil, and from the countryside comes a brutal, quasi-religious movement known as the Boxers, who seek to rid the country of foreign influence. An American missionary couple are killed, and their son Wayland is left barely clinging to life. Rescued by Chinese passers-by, he begins his recovery in the still-simmering city of Tientsin, and he finds his new Chinese family has dark secrets of their own. He is thrust into a deadly dispute between two martial arts masters, and his fate will hinge on the outcome. Wayland must navigate between two worlds, and to do so, arms himself with the secrets of Chinese martial arts. Dragons and Boxers combines the best of Martial Arts writing with exquisite historical story-telling.

About The Author

Kyle Fiske grew up on a farm near the Canadian border in northern New York State. He studied history and English at St. Lawrence University and the University of Copenhagen, as well as museum studies at Tufts University. Kyle was a competitive fencer for several years and has been a practitioner of Chinese martial arts for more than two decades, with a special focus on Chinese swordsmanship. He is the author of the short story collection Even Closer Than the Sea, and he’s also a long-time guitar player and songwriter. Kyle now makes his home on scenic and historic Cape Ann, Massachusetts.

Reviews

“Genuine sword fighting experience is something few writers have, but fortunately for the reader, Fiske does. Throughout the story, Fiske brings his years of training in Chinese martial arts and full contact swordplay to the page, lending the training and fight scenes a realism only a student of the arts can conjure up.” — Scott M. Rodell, Author of “Chinese Swordsmanship – The Yang Family Taiji Jian Tradition,” “Fundamentals of the Wudang Sword Method,” “Ming Chinese Military Swordsmanship,” and other titles.

CEO Pessimism Over Global Growth Reaches Record High – PwC

As we enter a new decade, CEOs are showing record levels of pessimism in the global economy, with 53% predicting a decline in the rate of economic growth in 2020.

This is up from 29% in 2019 and just 5% in 2018 – the highest level of pessimism since we started asking this question in 2012. By contrast, the number of CEOs projecting a rise in the rate of economic growth dropped from 42% in 2019 to only 22% in 2020.  These are some of the key findings of PwC’s 23rd survey of almost 1,600 CEOs from 83 countries across the world, launched today at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland.

CEO pessimism over global economic growth is particularly significant in North America, Western Europe and the Middle East, with 63%, 59% and 57% of CEOs from those regions predicting lower global growth in the year ahead.

“Given the lingering uncertainty over trade tensions, geopolitical issues and the lack of agreement on how to deal with climate change, the drop in confidence in economic growth is not surprising – even if the scale of the change in mood is,” said Bob Moritz, Chairman, of the PwC Network. “These challenges facing the global economy are not new – however the scale of them and the speed at which some of them are escalating is new, the key issue for leaders gathering in Davos is: how are we going to come together to tackle them.”

“On a brighter note, while there is record pessimism amongst business leaders, there are still real opportunities out there. With an agile strategy, a sharp focus on the changing expectations of stakeholders, and the experience many have built up over the last ten years in a challenging environment, business leaders can weather an economic downturn and continue to thrive.”

CEO confidence in own revenue growth declines

CEOs are also not so positive about their own companies’ prospects for the year ahead, with only 27% of CEOs saying they are  “very confident” in their own organisation’s growth over the next 12 months – the lowest level we have seen since 2009 and down from 35% last year.  

While confidence levels are generally down across the world, there is a wide variation from country to country, with China and India showing the highest levels of confidence among major economies at 45% and 40% respectively, the US at 36%, Canada at 27%, the UK at 26%, Germany at 20%, France 18%, and Japan having the least optimistic CEOs with only 11% of  CEOs very confident of growing revenues in 2020.

When asked about their own revenue growth prospects, the change in CEO sentiment has proven to be an excellent predictor of global economic growth. Analysing CEO forecasts since 2008, the correlation between CEO confidence in their 12-month revenue growth and the actual growth achieved by the global economy has been very close (see exhibit4 in notes). If the analysis continues to hold, global growth could slow to 2.4% in 2020 below many estimates including the 3.4% October growth prediction from the IMF.

China looks beyond the US for growth

Overall the US just retains its lead as the top market CEOs look to for growth over the next 12 months at 30%, one percentage point ahead of China at 29%.  However, ongoing trade conflicts and political tensions have seriously dented the attractiveness of the US for China CEOs.  In 2018, 59% of China CEOs selected the US as one of their top three growth markets, in 2020 this has dropped dramatically to just 11%. The US loss has been Australia’s gain, with 45% of China CEOs now looking to Australia as a top three key growth market compared with only 9% two years ago.

The other countries making the top five for growth are unchanged from last year – Germany (13%), India (9%) and the UK (9%). A strong result for the UK given the uncertainty created by Brexit. Australia is just outside the top five boosted by its increased attractiveness for China CEOs.

Worries about uncertain economic growth on the rise

In 2019 when asked about the top threats to their organisation’s growth prospects, uncertain economic growth ranked outside the top ten concerns for CEOs at number twelve. This year it has leapt to third place, just behind trade conflicts – another risk that has risen up the CEOs agenda – and the perennial over-regulation, which has again topped the table as the number one threat for CEOs. 

CEOs are also increasingly concerned about cyber threats and climate change and environmental damage, however despite the increasing number of extreme weather events and the intensity of debate on the issue, the magnitude of other threats continues to overshadow climate change which still does not make it into the CEOs’ top ten threats to growth.

Policing cyberspace

While CEOs around the world express clear concerns about the threat of over-regulation, they are also predicting significant regulatory changes in the technology sector. Globally over two-thirds of CEOs believe that governments will introduce new legislation to regulate the content on both the internet and social media and to break up dominant tech companies. A majority of CEOs (51%) also predict that governments will increasingly compel the private sector to financially compensate individuals for the personal data that they collect. 

However, CEOs are in two minds as to whether governments are striking the right balance in designing privacy regulation between increasing consumer trust and maintaining business competitiveness, with 41% saying it does strike the right balance and 43% saying it doesn’t.

The upskilling challenge

While the shortage of key skills remains a top threat to growth for CEOs and they agree that retraining/upskilling is the best way to close the skills gap, they are not making much headway in tackling the problem with only 18% of CEOs saying they have made “significant progress” in establishing an upskilling programme.  This sentiment is echoed by workers. In a separate survey by PwC, 77% of 22,000 workers around the world say they would like to learn new skills or retrain but only 33% feel they have been given the opportunity to develop digital skills outside their normal duties.

“Upskilling will be one of the key issues discussed this week at Davos and business leaders, educators, government and civil society must work together to ensure that people around the world stay productively engaged in meaningful and rewarding work. Leaders have a key role to play; although people may have fears about the future, they want to learn and develop and they are looking to leaders to provide a trusted path forward,” added Bob Moritz.

Climate change – challenge or chance?

Although climate change does not appear in the top ten threats to CEOs’ growth prospects, CEOs are expressing a growing appreciation of the upside of taking action to reduce their carbon footprint. Compared to a decade ago, when we last asked this question, CEOs are now twice as likely to “strongly agree” that investing in climate change initiatives will boost reputational advantage (30% in 2020 compared with 16% in 2010) and 25% of CEOs today compared with 13% in 2010 see climate change initiatives leading to new product and service opportunities for their organisation. 

While views of climate change driven product and service opportunities have remained relatively stable in the US and the UK, there has been a dramatic shift in views in China over the last ten years. In 2010, only 2% of China CEOs saw climate change leading to opportunities whereas in 2020 this has risen to 47%, by far the largest increase of CEOs in any country included in the survey.  However, for these opportunities to turn into long term success stories the principles of climate change need to be embedded right across a businesses’ supply chain and customer experience.

Source: PwC

Mindray Launches New TE7 ACE Point-of-Care Solution to Improve Diagnostic Confidence

Mindray Medical (SZSE: 300760), a leading global provider of medical devices and solutions, announces the release of its new Point-of-Care Ultrasound System, TE7 ACE.

This new Touch Screen Ultrasound System provides targeted solutions to diverse point-of-care scenarios including: Anesthesia, Critical Care and Emergency.

Featuring smart fluid management tools, safe needling toolkit, seamless data connectivity and a complete disinfection solution, TE7 ACE helps clinicians to deal with diagnostic challenges and make rapid decision.

“Having identified the clinical challenges, Mindray developed this solution to empower clinicians with more confidence to focus on patient care,” said Mr. Xujin He, the General Manager of Medical Imaging System Business Unit at Mindray.

In terms of managing patient body fluid, quick assessment can help to work out the fluid therapy plan and save lives. Based on deep learning algorithms, the clinically proven advanced fluid measurement tools of TE7 ACE are offered to accelerate patient assessments accurately and efficiently:

  • Smart VTI: automatically calculates the Velocity Time Integral, Cardiac Output and Stroke Volume Variation. The trending graph helps for efficient recording and guides for the fluid therapy.
  • Smart IVC: automatically traces the IVC diameter change, and calculates the Collapsibility Index or Distensibility Index and IVC Variation, helps for the assessment of volume status and responsiveness.
  • Smart B-line: automatically calculates B-lines number, percentage, and distance. It provides unique visual scoring map for intuitive overall lung water evaluation, guiding the fluid infusion and preventing pulmonary edema.

To ensure safe, simple and convenient needle guidance, the newly launched L12-3VNs with 3 programmable buttons combines eSpacial NaviTM and remote control into one so that clinicians can perform puncture without touching the system.

The connectivity solution eGateway also enables TE7 ACE to seamlessly fit into the existing hospital network, incorporating patient’s clinical data collected from both ultrasound equipment and patient monitors for wiser clinical decision making. This efficient and paperless process improves productivity while reducing the risk of transcription errors.