Chinese literature

The Boat to Redemption

The Boat to Redemption

Disgraced Secretary Ku has been banished from the Party – it has been officially proved he does not have a fish-shaped birthmark on his bottom and is therefore not the son of a revolutionary martyr, but the issue of a river pirate and a prostitute.

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Raise the Red Lantern

Raise the Red Lantern

The brutal realities of the dark places Su Tong depicts in this collection of novellas set in 1930s provincial China — worlds of prostitution, poverty, and drug addiction — belie his prose of stunning and simplebeauty.

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Desire and Fictional Narrative in Late Imperial China

Desire and Fictional Narrative in Late Imperial China

In this study of desire in Late Imperial China, Martin W. Huang argues that the development of traditional Chinese fiction as a narrative genre was closely related to changes in conceptions of the fundamental nature of desire.

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Chinese Aesthetics and Literature

Chinese Aesthetics and Literature

This comprehensive introduction to Chinese aesthetics and literature includes the major modern genres of poetry, fiction, and drama.

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Ameliorative Satire and the Seventeenth-century Chinese Novel, Xingshi Yinyuan Zhuan-marriage as Retribution, Awakening the World

Ameliorative Satire and the Seventeenth-century Chinese Novel, Xingshi Yinyuan Zhuan-marriage as Retribution, Awakening the World

Traditionally, scholars of Chinese literature have viewed Wu Jingzi’s The Scholars (ca. 1750) as the first satiric novel of Chinese literature.

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