Shanghai nurse mistakenly gave out abortion drugs to a pregnant patient

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medical malpractice in China

A nurse of the Shanghai Pudong Maternal and Child Health Hospital, mistakenly gave out abortion drugs to a fourth-month pregnant patient, leading to the miscarriage of the pregnant woman.

Since this was the first pregnancy of Jiao Li (a pseudonym), a pregnant woman, after a consultation with her family, she chose to listen to the recommendations of the physicians, and on July 3th, she accepted the hospital treatment to check a small amount of amniotic fluid leak.

After the hospital infusion, Jiao Li had drug allergy symptoms, such as hot itching and red lumps. The doctors stopped the infusion. A few hours later a nurse was sent to give medicine to the ward and sent to Jiao Li a white tablet cut in half. Jiao Li didn't notice the name of the drug, she just clearly saw the letter "m". The woman asked the nurse what kind of medicine was, and she even asked four times if the medicine was right.

A few minutes later, her husband went to the nurse station, asked the name of the drug and told the nurses on duty that he and her wife just saw a letter "m" on the medicine. After hearing what the husband said, the nurse appeared worried, and three other nurses rushed to the pharmacy to find the drug. After finding the drug blister from the trash, the nurse said: "The medicine was wrong. It was an abortion drug (Mifepristone)".

Jiao Li was shocked. Doctors recommended Jiao Li to drink water to induce vomiting. Later Jiao Li recalled she felt nausea, vaginal bleeding, and on August 29, she had the abortion.

The nurse has been suspended. The hospital admitted they gave her the wrong drug but refused to admit the event was a medical incident: "It can not be regarded as a medical malpractice because it had no serious consequences. It can only be regarded as a fault. It can be called medical malpractice."

Source

Interview with Luo Yang - "Girls"

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Luo Yang - Girls
(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

LUO Yang (1984) was born and raised in Liaoning Province, China. She is a graduate of the prestigious Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts in Shenyang.

A graphic designer by education, she decided to pursue her interest and talent in photography instead. Today, she lives and works in Beijing & Shanghai as a freelance photographer. In 2012, Ai Weiwei designated her one of the “rising stars of Chinese photography” (New Statesman).

She has had exhibitions all over China and participated in major shows in Europe, amongst them Ai Weiwei’s “FUCK OFF 2” at the Groninger Museum, Netherlands, in 2013. In her work, highly staged portraits and carefully constructed poses alternate with a raw, blurred snapshot-aesthetic.

Why did you choose GIRLS as the main Subject of your artwork?

I think it comes from my own life experience. Their real life is attracting me. I can feel that they have the same questions and feelings as I do; I can see their fragilities and confusions. Same emotions, different stories. Girls have attracted me ever since I first picked up a camera. Shooting their life is just like shooting my own.

Luo Yang - Girls

(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

Who are the GIRLS? Where did you meet them?

Some of them are my friends, some are friends of friends, some are just strangers, or girls I got to know from the internet. They have different occupations, but most of them are doing the things they like. The girls in my pictures change as my life changes, too. Some of the earliest girls I photographed in my hometown in North-Eastern China. They were my friends during my time at university. Then I went to Beijing and started to shoot Beijing-girls and then also girls from Shanghai. It depends on where I am. I like to shoot girls from different
places and backgrounds, but they all have common character traits.

Luo Yang - Girls

(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

How does a shooting take place, how do you approach the GIRLS?

Every shooting is very natural, we chitchat, go to their places, play and relax together. Actually, what I am trying to do is to observe and understand, to approach them in a very natural way. The shooting times are very different. With some of them, I can catch real moments in just one shooting, while with others I need a few times.

Luo Yang - Girls

(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

How do you choose a specific surrounding or setting, like a highway, a girl’s apartment or even her closet?

We choose random places together. Mostly, we go to places or spaces that they like and that make them feel relaxed. Pi Pi, for example, suggested this abandoned highway. She and her friends often go there for fun. It is interesting to have such a strong comparison between publicity and privacy.

Interview with Luo Yang

(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

Your portraits seem Bold and Up-front but also very Personal and Private. How are the GIRLS related to your own world and your own view on life?

The girls in my pictures are not very much related to my own personal life, but we kind of have a spiritual connection. From the first time I met them, I felt things inside their heart. Some of them have a very different life from mine. I feel that they are braver than I am; they are doing things that I don’t have the courage to do. By shooting them, I understood their life better and it made my own world bigger and wider. We might have different values and worldviews, but what we have in common are a fragility and braveness inside of us. We face the world with our sincerity.

Luo Yang - Girls

To our Western eyes, the portraits are powerful manifestations of independence and individualism. Do you feel that they also represent a new or different generation of women in China? Do you feel that the role of women in Chinese society is evolving and in what ways?

I can’t say that they represent the whole new generation of women in China, but they are absolutely a group of women who represent independence and freedom and who are ahead of their age. Yes, the role of women is evolving: they are chasing their dreams in their own way, without bonds, to achieve their ideal life step by step. I believe they will reach their dreams finally.

Luo Yang - Girls

Are there other artists who inspire your work?

I like female artists like Marina Abramovic, Ana Mendieta, Eija Liisa Ahtila, Cindy Sherman and Sophie Calle. The emotions and stories in their artworks attract me. But I also draw inspiration from movies, fashion and design.

Luo Yang - Girls

(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

Do you have a favorite image in the GIRLS series? Which one and why?

I like the image of the couple with tattoos. I knew the girl before I took the picture. She is bold, free and straightforward. When I went to shoot her and her husband, I got a new understanding of them. I felt the love between two free people who both have a strong personality. I also saw the changes they made for each other’s love. It’s touching. I can only think about two words to describe what this image stands for —freedom and
love.

Luo Yang - Girls

(c) Luo Yang / Courtesy of MO-Industries.com

Will you continue with the series and how do you think it will evolve? What are your future objectives?

Sure, I will continue. I think it will evolve as my life changes, too. Women will always be my main subject. Maybe I will also work with video and film in the future. I hope I can help to provide assistance to women, to give some emotional and mental support. I would like to found an NGO [non-governmental organization] in the future. I need to figure out how to do this. This is my main interest at the moment.

MO-šINDUSTRIES
www.mo-industries.com

MO-Industries is a POP-UP art gallery project that is based in Shanghai and Berlin. It was founded in 2014 to foster cultural exchange between China and Germany. In 2015 and 2016, Singapore and Hong Kong were added to the portfolio. Committed to introducing contemporary art from Asia to Germany and vice versa, we shed light on cultural traits and peculiarities. MO-Industries is a POP-UP art gallery project that is based in Shanghai and Berlin. It was founded in 2014 to foster cultural exchange between China and Germany. In 2015 and 2016, Singapore and Hong Kong were added to the portfolio. Committed to introducing contemporary art from Asia to Germany and vice versa, we shed light on cultural traits and peculiarities.

How to make Chinese noodle

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The amazing skill of a Chinese chef in making spinach noodles. A typical Xi'An street food delicacy.

How to make Chinese noodle

Video by Travel Thirsty via Come fare gli spaghetti cinesi

Who collects costs for Trump's Taiwan call?

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Trump's Taiwan call
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump gives a thumbs up to the media as he arrives at a costume party at the home of hedge fund billionaire and campaign donor Robert Mercer in Head of the Harbor, New York, U.S., December 3, 2016. REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich/File Photo

BEIJING (Reuters) - There are many pressure points China can push to express its anger at Donald Trump's call with Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen last week, including luring away more of Taiwan's diplomatic allies and ramping up military deployments in the Taiwan Strait.

Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks on the phone with U.S. president-elect Donald Trump at her office in Taipei, Taiwan, December 3, 2016. Taiwan Presidential Office/Handout via REUTERS
Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen speaks on the phone with U.S. president-elect Donald Trump at her office in Taipei, Taiwan, December 3, 2016. Taiwan Presidential Office/Handout via REUTERS

China's irritation with the call, the first by a U.S. president-elect or president since President Jimmy Carter switched diplomatic recognition from Taiwan to China in 1979, has mostly been directed at the self-ruled island China claims as its own.

But it could also make life difficult for the United States and its allies in the region.

Shi Yinhong, head of the Centre for American Studies at Beijing's Renmin University, who has advised the government on diplomatic issues, said China was still in a wait-and-see period when it came to Trump, noting Beijing's reaction to the call had been quite restrained.

But that would change if Trump continued like this in office, Shi said.

"Without a doubt, if the Chinese government judges a president Trump wants to challenge the 'One China' principle followed since President Carter, China will definitely make a very strong response."

That could include policy towards North Korea, where China has been working with Washington to rein in Pyongyang's nuclear programme, or in the disputed South China Sea.

"Everything is possible," he said.

Beijing could, for example, ease up on United Nations sanctions on North Korea, providing economic succour to a country developing missiles that could target the United States, or take a more aggressive stance to U.S. freedom of navigation patrols in the South China Sea, where it has so far limited itself to verbal warnings.

Washington and Beijing have also cooperated on the multilateral agreement to limit Iran's nuclear programme and on climate change, areas that Trump has said he wants to revisit to get a better deal for the U.S.

The status of Taiwan is an unresolved issue from China's civil war, when defeated Nationalist forces fled there in 1949, posing a pointed challenge to the Communist Party's claim to rule all of China.

Beijing has never renounced the use of force to bring what it calls a "renegade province" under its control, and Taiwan estimates that China has hundreds of missiles targeting the island over the narrow straits that separate them.

PUNISHING TAIWAN

The Global Times, an outspoken and influential tabloid published by the ruling Communist Party's official People's Daily, said punishing Taiwan was the best way to convey a message to Trump.

"The Chinese mainland can let Taiwan lose one or two diplomatic allies as a punishment as well as a warning. The mainland can also strengthen its military deployment," it said in editorials in its Chinese and English editions.

The number of countries maintaining formal ties with Taiwan, which until 1971 held China's seat at the United Nations, has since been whittled away by China to just 22, mostly poor nations in Latin America and the Caribbean.

An unofficial diplomatic truce between China and Taiwan ended earlier this year after Tsai was elected in January, when China established ties with former Taiwan ally Gambia.

Last week a large Chinese business delegation visited Panama, another Taiwan friend.

Tsai says she wants peace and stability with China, but China fears she wants to push the island's formal independence, one of the core principles of her Democratic Progressive Party.

China could also step up its divide-and-rule policy favouring pro-China politicians in Taiwan with trade and access deals, while excluding those from the ruling party.

"TERRIBLE PRECEDENT"

The People's Daily overseas edition said the Trump-Tsai call set a "terrible precedent" for China-U.S. ties and put a big question mark over a smooth transition in the relationship.

Jia Qingguo, dean of the School of International Relations at Peking University and a government advisor, said the incident would help Chinese leaders get past initial uncertainty about Trump and better understand what his administration could mean for China, but "in a negative way".

"Donald Trump is hurting the relationship, and that will also hurt U.S. interests. If he continues this when he is in office, I assume we will have more frictions - over trade, over Taiwan. This is bad for both countries."

Beijing also has to bear in mind the opinion of a Chinese public brought up to insist on sovereignty over Taiwan.

"Taiwan is simply a province of our China," said one user on Weibo, China's answer to Twitter. "Anywhere, anytime we can bring things to a conclusion. Have no worries about that."

China and Taiwan have nearly gone to war three times since 1949, most recently ahead of the 1996 Taiwan presidential election.

Then, China carried out missile tests in waters close to the island, hoping to dissuade people voting for Lee Teng-hui, whom it suspected of harbouring pro-independence views. Lee won by a landslide.

In the intervening 20 years, Chinese wealth and power have grown.

"China is much stronger now," said Jia, the academic and advisor. "Presumably a U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan would have a much more negative impact on the international order and relations between the two countries."

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard and Michael Martina; Editing by Will Waterman)

16 Chinese Cheerleaders Embarrassing Moments

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Chinese Cheerleaders

163.com has published a series of images of Chinese cheerleaders dealing with incidents relevant to clothing.

Chinese cheerleaders during the acrobatic dances to encourage basketball or volleyball teams during the championships, often found themselves with uniform gliding, underwear exposed, bra shoulder straps off, trousers broken just during the performances. Embarrassed, they have to hold down clothes still dancing.

Many of these uniforms haven't been designed to dance or practice with athletic movements, in fact, some of these are very similar to those used by Chinese hostess at Trade Shows or local products promotions. For years in China, cheerleaders performance is an important moment during a sporting event, but it seems that at times Chinese cheerleaders don't have a suitable uniform that can prevent these moments of public embarrassment. Is it part of the game?

Chinese cheerleaders images

000momenti-imbarazzanti

001momenti-imbarazzanti chinese cheerleader 014momenti-imbarazzanti 013momenti-imbarazzanti 012momenti-imbarazzanti 011momenti-imbarazzanti 010momenti-imbarazzanti 009momenti-imbarazzanti 008momenti-imbarazzanti 007momenti-imbarazzanti 006momenti-imbarazzanti 005momenti-imbarazzanti asian cheerleader asian cheerleaders chinese cheerleaders

Source: 163.com via Cheerleader cinesi

Topic: Chinese cheerleaders images , embarrassing moments, funny images

China's Xi says 'watching closely' following U.S. election

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Xi Jinping and Henry Kissinger
Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (L) meets China's President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Nicolas Asouri/Pool

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese President Xi Jinping told former U.S. secretary of state Henry Kissinger on Friday that China was watching U.S. politics "very closely" following the presidential election won by Republican Donald Trump.

Trump lambasted China throughout the U.S. election campaign, drumming up headlines with his pledges to slap 45 percent tariffs on imported Chinese goods and to label the country a currency manipulator.

Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (L) meets China's President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Nicolas Asouri/Pool
Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (L) meets China's President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Nicolas Asouri/Pool

A few days after his victory, Xi told Trump in a telephone call that cooperation was the only choice for China and the United States.

"The presidential election has taken place in the United States and we are now in a key moment. We on the Chinese side are watching the situation very closely. Now it is the transition period," Xi told Kissinger, in remarks made in front of reporters.

"Overall, we would like to see the China-U.S. relationship move ahead in a stable and sustained manner," Xi said.

China and the United States must "uphold continued stable development of mutually beneficial bilateral trade relations," he added, in comments later posted on the foreign ministry website.

Xi Jinping
China's President Xi Jinping looks on before meeting with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (not pictured) at the Great Halll of the People in Beijing, China December 2, 2016. REUTERS/Nicolas Asouri/Pool

"The development of ties since the establishment of diplomatic relations show that the joint interests of China and the United States are far greater than disputes," Xi added.

"We are willing to make efforts together with the U.S. side to ensure the stable transition in China-U.S. ties, and at this new starting point continue stable development, to write a new chapter."

Xi met U.S. President Barack Obama on the margins of a regional summit in Lima last month where he called for a "smooth transition" in Beijing's relationship with the incoming cabinet

(Reporting by Christian Shepherd and Michael Martina; Additional reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Tom Heneghan)

U.N. slaps new sanctions on North Korea to slash cash from exports

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new sanctions on North Korea
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un guides the 3rd Meeting of Activists of the Korean People's Army (KPA) in the Movement for Winning the Title of O Jung Hup-led 7th Regiment in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang on August 4, 2016. KCNA/ via REUTERS

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - The U.N. Security Council imposed new sanctions on North Korea on Wednesday aimed at cutting its annual export revenue by a quarter, after Pyongyang carried out its fifth and largest nuclear test so far in September.

The 15-member council unanimously adopted a resolution to slash North Korea's exports of coal, its biggest export item, by about 60 percent with an annual sales cap of $400.9 million, or 7.5 million metric tonnes, whichever is lower.

The U.S.-drafted resolution also bans North Korean copper, nickel, silver and zinc exports - and the sale of statues. Pyongyang is famous for building huge, socialist-style statues which it exports mainly to African countries.

North Korea rejected the resolution as yet another conspiracy masterminded by the United States to deny its sovereignty.

A North Korean flag is pictured at its embassy in Beijing January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
A North Korean flag is pictured at its embassy in Beijing January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

The U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, told the council after the vote that the United States was realistic about what the new sanctions on North Korea - also known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) - will achieve.

"No resolution in New York will likely, tomorrow, persuade Pyongyang to cease its relentless pursuit of nuclear weapons. But this resolution imposes unprecedented costs on the DPRK regime for defying this council's demands," she said.

"In total, this resolution will slash by at least $800 million per year the hard currency that the DPRK has to fund its prohibited weapons programs, which constitutes a full 25 percent of the DPRK's entire export revenues."

That $800 million is 6.5 times the amount the World Food Programme said it needed in 2016 to fund its North Korea operations, or 1.2 million tonnes of rice at market prices.

North Korea needs 5.2 million tonnes of rice annually to meet its stated target of providing people with 573g of rice a day.

The North's foreign ministry said the Security Council was applying a double standard it had never exercised on any other country that conducted nuclear tests including its permanent members.

"There will be no greater miscalculation than to think that Obama and his henchmen can use cowardly sanctions racket to try to force us to give up our nuclear armament policy or undermine our nuclear power status," the ministry said in a statement carried by the official KCNA news agency.

North Korea has said any sanctions against its missile or nuclear programmes are a violation of its sovereignty and right to self-defence.

A South Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman said South Korea welcomed the new resolution and would pursue additional unilateral sanctions against North Korea with the United States and Japan.

Reclusive North Korea and the rich, democratic South are technically still at war because their 1950-53 conflict ended in a truce, not a peace treaty. The North regularly threatens to destroy the South and the South's main ally, the United States.

North Korea has been under U.N. sanctions since 2006 over its nuclear and ballistic missile tests. It conducted its latest nuclear test on Sept. 9.

"Sanctions are only as effective as their implementation,"  U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told the council. "It is incumbent on all member states of the United Nations to make every effort to ensure that these sanctions are fully implemented."

China, believed to be the only country buying North Korean coal, would slash its imports by some $700 million compared with 2015 sales under the new sanctions, diplomats said.

Over the first 10 months of 2016, China imported 18.6 million tonnes of coal from North Korea, up almost 13 percent from a year earlier. North Korean exports to the end of 2016 will now be capped at $53.5 million, or 1 million metric tonnes.

While China said it was opposed to North Korea's nuclear tests, U.N. Ambassador Liu Jieyi accused the United States and South Korea of intensifying confrontation with North Korea by scaling up military exercises and presence.

He described the planned U.S. deployment of a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system in South Korea as "neither conducive to the realization of the goal of de-nuclearization of the Korean peninsula nor helpful to the maintenance of peace and stability on the peninsula."

The U.N. resolution blacklisted 11 more individuals, including former ambassadors to Egypt and Myanmar, and 10 entities, subjecting them to a global travel ban and asset freeze for ties to North Korea's nuclear and missile programs.

It calls on U.N. states to reduce the number of staff at North Korea's foreign missions and requires countries to limit the number of bank accounts to one per North Korean diplomatic mission amid concerns that Pyongyang had used its diplomats and foreign missions to engage in illicit activities.

By Michelle Nichols

(Additional reporting by Jack Kim, James Pearson and Yun Hwan Chae in SEOUL; Editing by Jonathan Oatis and Nick Macfie)

46 images of models at the Chinese BBQ

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sexy Chinese models

Those who were in Taiwan and has decided to have dinner at Shao Kao (Chinese BBQ set up in the streets or alleys) certainly didn't expect to be in front of a young model in a bikini, instead of the traditional local chef with an apron.

Recently on Chinese social networks have begun to circulate images of a young and sensual girl who was cooking skewers and looked after the management of a street restaurant. Clearly, as we can see the girl in question has not been taken by the owner of the street eating place to work at, but she is a friend of him, that works as a model. She was invited to a dinner and  then she agreed to pose for a series of shots that have well helped the owner to triple his sales. Customers curious and attracted by Hong Xin Yuri, found her very similar to local actress Elva Hsiao.

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This promotion strategy is clearly inspired by photographic services published on FHM (For Him Magazine) released in the beginning of this year, where some models were introduced, in an unusual context, with fashion clothes. These models were photographed to be pursuing those professions which are often carried out by people who live in "urban village", the poorest part of China's population.

Chinese model 010fashion-mercato-vicoli 011fashion-mercato-vicoli 012fashion-mercato-vicoli 013fashion-mercato-vicoli 014fashion-mercato-vicoli

On April, photographer Liu Jia Nan posted on his microblog a series of photos taken in the narrow streets of Beijing, in which he portrayed young Chinese models and a foreign model acting as street vendors, traditional barber etc … This series of shots drawn attention of Chinese netizens, due of the beautiful and sensual models, but it also remarked that although China is an economic power continuously growing, with an increasing number of billionaires, in China there is a part of population who still live in the alleys of the "urban village".

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Source and Photo: http://slide.ent.sina.com.cn/ via modelle cinesi al bbq

Man sparks outrage in China with live stream of cremation

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cremation live stream

Cremation live stream: a man in Chengdu, in Sichuan, attracted the wrath of many netizens  after he live-streamed the cremations of several corpses.

A man in Chengdu, Sichuan province, has posted several videos of cremation of corpses on a live-streaming platform called KuaiShouZhiBo. Under the account of the man, allegedly a mortician, viewers can watch live-streaming videos of the bodies and access to personal information of the deceased. According to People.cn, the man made inappropriate jokes about cremation, calling it a process for "The dead to quickly warm themselves by the fire".

A second account has posted 8 more videos showing the cremation ceremony. Many corpses are clearly visible in the video. Both accounts were deleted.

According to Jiang Pen, the director of Chengdu Mortuary Institution, there's no way to confirm whether the incident took place in their mortuary house. The incident quickly went viral on Chinese social media, igniting public wrath. One netizen wrote the cremation is a sacred and private ceremony, such disrespect to the deceased should not be tolerated.

cremazione_001

Feng Jun, a Chengdu-based lawyer stated: “By filming and posting the cremation of the dead, this man has already violated the rights of reputation of the deceased. The relatives of the deceased can sue him if they want".

cremazione_002

People.cn Via Cina Oggi

China tells Taiwan to stay out of Hong Kong debate

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Hong Kong democracy
Pro-independence activists Yau Wai-Ching (R) and Baggio Leung meet journalists outside High Court after they lost an appeal against their disqualification as lawmakers in Hong Kong, China November 30, 2016. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

BEIJING (Reuters) - China called on Wednesday on Taiwan to stay out Hong Kong's affairs, saying self-ruled Taiwan was "talking nonsense" about the former British colony and warning it not to damage Hong Kong's stability.

Chinese leaders are concerned about a fledgling independence movement in Hong Kong, which returned to mainland rule in 1997 with a promise of autonomy, and recent protests in the city.

Pro-independence activists Yau Wai-Ching (R) and Baggio Leung meet journalists outside High Court after they lost an appeal against their disqualification as lawmakers in Hong Kong, China November 30, 2016. REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Pro-independence activists Yau Wai-Ching (R) and Baggio Leung meet journalists outside High Court after they lost an appeal against their disqualification as lawmakers in Hong Kong, China November 30, 2016. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

Beijing staged a rare interpretation of Hong Kong's mini-constitution, the Basic Law, in early November to effectively bar pro-independence city lawmakers, Baggio Leung and Yau Wai-ching, from taking office there.

The pair lost an appeal on Wednesday into an earlier Hong Kong court ruling that disqualified them after they insulted China while taking their oaths last month.

Three Court of Appeal judges ruled that Yau, 25, and Leung, 30, had no grounds to re-take their oath as a matter of law.

Yau and Leung, elected in September polls, have yet to confirm earlier plans to take their case to Hong Kong's highest court, the Court of Final Appeal.

Asked about comments from legislators from Taiwan's ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), which favours the island's formal independence, offering support for Leung and Yau, China's Taiwan Affairs Office said independence activists from both sides were trying to link up and sow chaos in Hong Kong.

Pro-independence activists Yau Wai-Ching (L) and Baggio Leung meet journalists outside High Court after they lost an appeal against their disqualification as lawmakers in Hong Kong, China November 30, 2016.  REUTERS/Bobby Yip
Pro-independence activists Yau Wai-Ching (L) and Baggio Leung meet journalists outside High Court after they lost an appeal against their disqualification as lawmakers in Hong Kong, China November 30, 2016. REUTERS/Bobby Yip

"Compatriots on both sides of the Taiwan Strait, especially those in Hong Kong, should be on high alert for this," spokesman Ma Xiaoguang told reporters in Beijing.

"The words and deeds of Baggio Leung and Yau Wai-ching run contrary to mainstream public opinion in Hong Kong and Hong Kong resident's basic interests, but relevant parties in Taiwan are helping them, to what intent?" Ma asked.

"We advise the Taiwan side not to talk nonsense about the Hong Kong issue, interfere in Hong Kong's enforcement of 'one country, two systems', or damage Hong Kong's prosperity and stability," he said.

Hong Kong returned to China under a "one country, two systems" agreement that ensured its freedoms and wide-ranging autonomy, including a separate legal system.

Democratically-elected legislators Yau Wai-Ching and Baggio Leung (3nd-R) speak to media after a High Court disqualified them from taking office in Hong Kong, China November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu
Democratically-elected legislators Yau Wai-Ching and Baggio Leung (3nd-R) speak to media after a High Court disqualified them from taking office in Hong Kong, China November 15, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

But Communist Party rulers in Beijing have ultimate control, and some Hong Kong people are concerned they are increasingly interfering to head off dissent.

China considers self-ruled Taiwan a wayward province and has never renounced the use of force to bring it under its control. Defeated Nationalist forces fled there at the end of a civil war with the Communists in 1949.

Relations between China and Taiwan have worsened since the election of the DPP's Tsai as Taiwan president in January.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard in Beijing and Pak Yiu in Hong Kong; Editing by Robert Birsel)

Topic: Hong Kong democracy

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